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Wearing of Mouthguards

posted 25 May 2016, 17:07 by Canada GAA

It has been brought to our attention that players are participating in games without wearing mouth guards. Therefore, effective immediately: A player who refuses to comply with the referee's instruction to use a mouthguard shall be Cautioned (Yellow Card) and ordered off (Red Card) should the offender persist in refusing.


Following the GAA’s Annual Congress in April 2012 a new rule was enacted that made it mandatory to use a mouthguard in all Gaelic football matches and training sessions from January 1st 2013 (for all age grades up to and including minor) and at U21 and, at Adult level from January 1st 2014.


The reasons for wearing a mouthguard during sporting activities is obvious, to protect the teeth from fracture and the accompanying expensive repair work.


The main function of a mouthguard is to dissipate the impact of a collision around your mouth rather than on one tooth.


There are several kinds of mouthguards available. Mouth Adapted “boil and bite” mouthguards, these can be purchased in most sports stores, although they are preferable to not wearing a mouthguard at all, they do not effectively adapt to the shape of your mouth and jaw bone.


A custom made mouthguard is the best form of protection from dental trauma, an impression (mould) is taken of your mouth, not just your teeth but also your jaw bone (maxilla). The mouth guard is then made in a lab to fit your teeth and jaw bone exactly. This type of mouth guard covers much more surface area and so can take more forces and dissipate those forces around your mouth more effectively than the other mouthguards you can buy in the sports stores.


A player who refuses to comply with the referee's instruction to use a mouthguard shall be Cautioned (Yellow Card) and ordered off (Red Card) should the offender persist in refusing.


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